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Immunity. 2019 Feb 19;50(2):505-519.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2019.01.012. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Spatial and Temporal Mapping of Human Innate Lymphoid Cells Reveals Elements of Tissue Specificity.

Author information

1
Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Joan and Stanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10021, USA.
2
Columbia Center for Translational Immunology, Department of Surgery and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, NY, New York, 10032, USA.
3
Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Joan and Stanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10021, USA; Baker Institute for Animal Health, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY 14850 USA.
4
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.
5
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA; Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.
6
Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Joan and Stanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10021, USA; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY, 10021, USA. Electronic address: lam2031@med.cornell.edu.
7
Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Joan and Stanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10021, USA. Electronic address: dartis@med.cornell.edu.

Abstract

Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) play critical roles in regulating immunity, inflammation, and tissue homeostasis in mice. However, limited access to non-diseased human tissues has hindered efforts to profile anatomically-distinct ILCs in humans. Through flow cytometric and transcriptional analyses of lymphoid, mucosal, and metabolic tissues from previously healthy human organ donors, here we have provided a map of human ILC heterogeneity across multiple anatomical sites. In contrast to mice, human ILCs are less strictly compartmentalized and tissue localization selectively impacts ILC distribution in a subset-dependent manner. Tissue-specific distinctions are particularly apparent for ILC1 populations, whose distribution was markedly altered in obesity or aging. Furthermore, the degree of ILC1 population heterogeneity differed substantially in lymphoid versus mucosal sites. Together, these analyses comprise a comprehensive characterization of the spatial and temporal dynamics regulating the anatomical distribution, subset heterogeneity, and functional potential of ILCs in non-diseased human tissues.

PMID:
30770247
PMCID:
PMC6594374
[Available on 2020-02-19]
DOI:
10.1016/j.immuni.2019.01.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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