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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2019 Feb 11. pii: S0002-9378(19)30356-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2019.02.015. [Epub ahead of print]

Cluster randomized trial of a patient-centered contraceptive decision support tool, My Birth Control.

Author information

1
Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco.
2
Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
3
Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Electronic address: kelsey.holt@ucsf.edu.
4
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco.
5
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco.
6
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research suggests the need for improvement in the patient-centeredness and comprehensiveness of contraceptive counseling. My Birth Control is a tablet-based decision support tool designed to improve women's experience of contraceptive counseling and to help them select contraceptive methods that are consistent with their values and preferences.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of My Birth Control on contraceptive continuation, experience of contraceptive care, and decision quality.

STUDY DESIGN:

Using a cluster randomized design, randomized at the provider level, patient participants interested in starting or changing contraception interacted with My Birth Control before their family planning visit (intervention) or received usual care (control). A postvisit survey assessed experience of care method satisfaction, decision quality, and contraceptive knowledge. Surveys at 4 and 7 months assessed the primary outcome of contraceptive continuation, along with method use, satisfaction, and unintended pregnancy. Mixed-effects logistic regression models with multiple imputation for missing data were used to examine the effect of treatment assignment.

RESULTS:

Twenty-eight providers participated and 758 patients enrolled between December 5, 2014, and February 5, 2016. Participants were racially/ethnically diverse; less than a quarter self-identified as white. No effect was found on 7-month continuation (56.6% and 59.6% for intervention and control group respectively, odds ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-1.22). However, assignment to the intervention group increased reporting of the greatest Interpersonal Quality of Family Planning score (66.0% vs 57.4%, odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.05), the greatest scores on the informed decision and uncertainty subscales of the Decisional Conflict Scale (50.5% vs 43.2%, odds ratio, 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.80 and 41.6% vs 33.3%, odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.05), and greater knowledge.

CONCLUSION:

My Birth Control had no effect on contraceptive continuation. The intervention did enhance the experience of contraceptive counseling and informed decision making, as well as contraceptive knowledge., The intervention's effect on patient experience is important, particularly given the personal nature of contraceptive decision making and the social and historical context of family planning care.

KEYWORDS:

contraceptive continuation; contraceptive counseling; decision support tools; interpersonal quality of care; patient-centered care; shared decision making

PMID:
30763545
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2019.02.015

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