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Cell Host Microbe. 2019 Feb 13;25(2):219-232. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2019.01.014.

Phage Therapy: A Renewed Approach to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

Author information

1
Program in Microbiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
2
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
4
Program in Microbiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: paul.turner@yale.edu.

Abstract

Phage therapy, long overshadowed by chemical antibiotics, is garnering renewed interest in Western medicine. This stems from the rise in frequency of multi-drug-resistant bacterial infections in humans. There also have been recent case reports of phage therapy demonstrating clinical utility in resolving these otherwise intractable infections. Nevertheless, bacteria can readily evolve phage resistance too, making it crucial for modern phage therapy to develop strategies to capitalize on this inevitability. Here, we review the history of phage therapy research. We compare and contrast phage therapy and chemical antibiotics, highlighting their potential synergies when used in combination. We also examine the use of animal models, case studies, and results from clinical trials. Throughout, we explore how the modern scientific community works to improve the reliability and success of phage therapy in the clinic and discuss how to properly evaluate the potential for phage therapy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

PMID:
30763536
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2019.01.014

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