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Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2019 Feb;16(1):57-65. doi: 10.1007/s11904-019-00435-8.

Physiological Changes from Violence-Induced Stress and Trauma Enhance HIV Susceptibility Among Women.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0507, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0507, USA. ktsuyuki@ucsd.edu.
2
Department of Community-Public Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4
Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0507, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0507, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

This theoretical review identifies physiological mechanisms by which violence against women (VAW) may increase women's susceptibility to HIV through trauma, stress, and immune dysfunction.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Research documents systemic and local immune responses are related to stress and trauma from abuse across the life course (i.e., childhood, IPV, adulthood re-victimization). Findings are interpreted within a theoretical framework grounded in the Social Stress Theory and the concept of toxic stress, and highlight the current state of the science connecting: (1) VAW to the physiological stress response and immune dysfunction, and (2) the physiological stress response and inflammation to HIV susceptibility and infection in the female reproductive tract. Despite a dearth of research in human subjects, evidence suggests that VAW plays a significant role in creating a physiological environment conducive to HIV infection. We conclude with a discussion of promising future steps for this line of research.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Immune dysfunction; Physiological stress response; Trauma; Violence against women

PMID:
30762216
PMCID:
PMC6420839
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s11904-019-00435-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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