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Pediatr Res. 2019 Feb 13. doi: 10.1038/s41390-018-0263-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Diffuse optical tomography for the detection of perinatal stroke at the cot side: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK.
2
Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
3
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK. topun.austin@addenbrookes.nhs.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Perinatal stroke is a potentially debilitating injury, often under-diagnosed in the neonatal period. We conducted a pilot study investigating the role of the portable, non-invasive brain monitoring technique, diffuse optical tomography (DOT), as an early detection tool for infants with perinatal stroke.

METHODS:

Four stroke-affected infants were scanned with a DOT system within the first 3 days of life and compared to four healthy control subjects. Spectral power, correlation, and phase lag between interhemispheric low frequency (0.0055-0.3 Hz) hemoglobin signals were assessed. Optical data analyses were conducted with and without magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stroke localization to assess the efficacy of DOT when used without stroke anatomical information.

RESULTS:

Interhemispheric correlations of both oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration were significantly reduced in the stroke-affected group within the very low (0.0055-0.0095 Hz) and resting state (0.01-0.08 Hz) frequencies (p < 0.003). There were no interhemispheric differences for spectral power. These results were observed even without MRI stroke localization.

CONCLUSION:

This suggests that DOT and correlation-based analyses in the low-frequency range can potentially aid the early detection of perinatal stroke, prior to MRI acquisition. Additional methodological advances are required to increase the sensitivity and specificity of this technique.

PMID:
30759451
DOI:
10.1038/s41390-018-0263-x

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