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Int J Environ Health Res. 2019 Feb 13:1-14. doi: 10.1080/09603123.2019.1575951. [Epub ahead of print]

Risk of COPD due to indoor air pollution from biomass cooking fuel: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
a University School of Environment Management , Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University , New Delhi , India.
2
b Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine , Safdarjang Hospital and VMMC College, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University , New Delhi , India.

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing nations. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine the association between indoor air pollution and risk of COPD. Database searches were conducted using indoor air pollution, biomass and COPD related terms to identify relevant articles. The eligible studies were case-control, retrospective cohort, cross-sectional studies and conducted in adults that assessed COPD using any diagnostic criteria. A total of 35 studies with 73,122 participants were included. The pooled analysis showed that exposure to indoor air pollution due to solid biomass fuels increased risk of COPD by 2.65 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.13-3.31; n = 73,122) and chronic bronchitis by 2.89 (95% CI 2.18-3.82) times more compared to non-biomass fuels. The risk of COPD was higher in Africa region (odds ratio [OR] 3.19), Asia (OR 2.88), South America (OR 2.15), Europe (OR 2.30) and North America (OR 2.14). The results of our meta-analysis indicated that exposure to indoor air pollution due to biomass smoke is strongly associated with COPD. Abbreviations: CS: cross-sectional; CC: case-control; NR: not reported; ATS: American Thoracic Society; BMRC: British Medical Research Council; GOLD: Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease; IAP: indoor air pollution; BMF: biomass fuel; CB: chronic bronchitis; OR: odds ratio; UCI; upper confidence interval; LCI: lower confidence interval; COPD: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder; biomass fuel; indoor air pollution; meta-analysis; systematic reviews

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