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FASEB J. 2019 May;33(5):5979-5989. doi: 10.1096/fj.201801758R. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Expression of miRNAs in circulating exosomes derived from patients with persistent atrial fibrillation.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
3
Institute of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, is thought to be regulated by changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression. However, the evidence for this is inconsistent. The high stability and expression of circulating exosomal miRNAs may allow their use as candidate biomarkers. For the discovery phase, exosomes were isolated from the serum of patients with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) as the controls (n = 5) and with paroxysmal AF (n = 4) and persistent AF (n = 5) for microarray analysis of miRNAs. Forty-five miRNAs were expressed significantly higher (>1.5-fold) in patients with persistent AF, but not in patients with paroxysmal AF, relative to the levels in patients with SVT control. Notably, expression of 5 miRNAs (miRNA-103a, -107, -320d, -486, and let-7b) was elevated by more than 4.5-fold in patients with persistent AF. For the validation phase, miRNAs were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR analysis in exosomes from the serum of patients with SVT control (n = 20) and patients with persistent AF (n = 40). These miRNAs and their target genes were involved in atrial function and structure, oxidative stress, and fibrosis pathways. These findings suggest that serum exosomal miRNAs might be used as novel biomarkers to reflect the progression of AF.-Mun, D., Kim, H., Kang, J.-Y., Park, H., Park, H., Lee, S.-H., Yun, N., Joung, B. Expression of miRNAs in circulating exosomes derived from patients with persistent atrial fibrillation.

KEYWORDS:

biomarkers; microRNA; pathway

PMID:
30753098
DOI:
10.1096/fj.201801758R

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