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Reumatol Clin. 2019 Feb 8. pii: S1699-258X(19)30010-5. doi: 10.1016/j.reuma.2018.12.005. [Epub ahead of print]

Protocolised Odontological Assessment of Patients With Primary Sjögren's Syndrome.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, San Sebastián de los Reyes, Madrid, España.
2
Departamento de Especialidades Clínicas Odontológicas, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, España. Electronic address: rmlopezp@ucm.es.
3
Departamento de Especialidades Clínicas Odontológicas, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, España.
4
Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Majadahonda, Madrid, España.
5
(Departamento de Especialidades Clínicas Odontológicas, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid).
6
(Hospital Severo Ochoa, Madrid).
7
(Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Madrid).
8
(Hospital La Paz, Madrid).
9
(Hospital Infanta Sofía, Madrid).
10
(Hospital La Princesa, Madrid).
11
(Hospital San Chinarro, Madrid).
12
(Hospital Infanta Leonor).
13
(Hospital Gregorio Marañón).
14
(Hospital Doce de Octubre).
15
(Hospital La Paz).
16
(Hospital Infanta Elena).
17
(Hospital Fundación Jiménez Díaz).
18
(Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to describe the findings of a protocolised odontological evaluation of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) treated in rheumatology units in the Community of Madrid.

METHODS:

Multicentric descriptive study in which pSS patients classified according to the American-European consensus of 2002 criteria were included. We collected the demographic, clinical and serological data of each patient. A complete oral examination was performed and salivary flow and the CAOD caries index were collected. The patients completed the visual analogue scale for xerostomia, the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 questionnaire and an oral health questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Sixty-one patients were recruited. Ninety-eight percent were women and the mean age of the patients was 57 years. Pathological oral signs (unstimulated salivary flow/salivary glands sialography/scintigraphy) were present in 52.5% of the patients, anti-Ro/anti-La were positive in 90.2%. Ninety-two percent of the patients reported xerostomia and 61% of the patients suffered from hyposialia. Thirty-five patients presented oral mucosa lesions. CAOD index was 16.97±7.93 and visual analogue scale for xerostomia was 46.69±14.43. The results of the OHIP-14 questionnaire were 23.13±14.16. Patients with pathological oral signs obtained a significantly higher Oral Health Impact Profile-14 score (P=.03). We also found that patients with peripheral nervous system involvement obtained a significantly higher Oral Health Impact Profile-14 score (P=.001) CONCLUSIONS: The presence of xerostomia in this cohort of pSS patients was high and hyposialia was present in 61% of the patients. Oral lesions appeared in more than half of the subjects. Oral health had a negative impact on the quality of life of patients with pSS, being higher in those with pathological objective oral signs and in those with peripheral nervous system involvement.

KEYWORDS:

Calidad de vida; Hiposialia; Hyposialia; Oral dryness; Primary Sjögren's syndrome; Quality of life; Sequedad oral; Síndrome de Sjögren primario; Xerostomia; Xerostomía

PMID:
30745279
DOI:
10.1016/j.reuma.2018.12.005
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