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BMC Med Educ. 2019 Feb 11;19(1):53. doi: 10.1186/s12909-019-1483-4.

A simple and short microbiology practical improves undergraduate nursing students' awareness of bacterial traits and ability to avoid spreading infections.

Author information

1
Department of Fundamental Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12, Nishi 5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0812, Japan. r-yano@med.hokudai.ac.jp.
2
Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
3
Department of Fundamental Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12, Nishi 5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0812, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nurses are responsible for implementing appropriate measures to reduce hospital infections, especially with multidrug resistant bacteria, so nursing students should learn about microbiology. This helps them to understand bacterial dissemination and infectious disease control. Because of tight schedules, however, its teaching is limited in undergraduate nursing classes in Japan. We therefore tested whether a simple short practical session in a microbiology class could help to improve undergraduate nursing students' awareness of bacterial traits and how to prevent infections.

METHODS:

This study involved second-grade nursing students (n = 76). Two short practical sessions (a total of 3 h, across 2 days) were used to assess the effectiveness of washing or disinfection on hand bacteria in a 16-class microbiology course (total class time was 24 h, plus an exam). Hand bacteria were sampled on LB agar plates with orientation during the first half-day, and the plates examined for colonies with distinct color or morphological traits, and discussed, in the second session, a week later. Questionnaires before and after the exercise were used to assess changes in awareness of unseen bacteria inhabiting around us connecting bacterial traits and how to prevent infections.

RESULTS:

The results showed that the practical increased the nursing students' awareness of fomites (utensils) (p = 0.0115), fomites (contact-based) (p = 0.0016), habitats (body surface) (p = 0.0127), action facilitating hospital infection (p = 0.0166), and changes in physical condition caused by bacterial infections (p = 0.0136). There were no changes in word associations (p = 0.627) or habitats (inside body) (p = 0.308). Difficulty score, which is an element in questionnaire psychometric properties, tended to be close to the expected score through the practical, but not statistical significant. In addition, regardless of before or after practical, Cronbach α score, which is an indicator of the reliability among items of multi-choice questions, showed > 0.8, indicating validity of evaluation items. Thus, the student's awareness of unseen bacteria inhabiting around us was significantly increased as compared to those before practical in microbiology class.

CONCLUSIONS:

The simple short practical effectively improved nursing students' awareness of unseen bacteria inhabiting around us in microbiology course, useful for even tight teaching schedules.

KEYWORDS:

Awareness; Medical education; Microbiology; Nurse; Practical class; Undergraduates; Unseen bacteria

PMID:
30744704
PMCID:
PMC6371615
DOI:
10.1186/s12909-019-1483-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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