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Crit Care. 2019 Feb 11;23(1):42. doi: 10.1186/s13054-019-2338-4.

Thromboxane-prostaglandin receptor antagonist, terutroban, prevents neurovascular events after subarachnoid haemorrhage: a nanoSPECT study in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, University Hospital Timone, Marseille, France. david.lagier@ap-hm.fr.
2
C2VN Inserm 1263, Inra 1260, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France. david.lagier@ap-hm.fr.
3
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, University Hospital Timone, Marseille, France.
4
C2VN Inserm 1263, Inra 1260, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France.
5
CERIMED (European Center for Research in Medical Imaging), Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France.
6
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, INT (Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone), University Hospital Timone, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several lipid metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid are correlated with poor outcomes in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Most of these metabolites bind to ubiquitous thromboxane-prostaglandin (TP) receptors, causing vasoconstriction and inflammation. Here, we evaluated terutroban (TBN), a specific TP receptor antagonist, for the prevention of post-haemorrhage blood-brain barrier disruption, neuronal apoptosis and delayed cerebral hypoperfusion.

METHODS:

The rat double subarachnoid haemorrhage model was produced by twice injecting (days 1 and 2) autologous blood into the cisterna magna. Seventy-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to experimental groups. Rats exposed to subarachnoid haemorrhage were allocated to no treatment (SAH group) or TBN treatment by gastric gavage during the first 5 days after haemorrhage (SAH+TBN group). Control rats received artificial cerebrospinal fluid injections (CSF group). Sham-operated rats with or without TBN administration were also studied. Body weight and Garcia neurological scores were assessed on day 2 and day 5. We used nanoscale single-photon emission computed tomography (nanoSPECT) to measure brain uptake of three radiolabelled agents: 99mTechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentacetate (99mTc-DTPA), which indicated blood-brain barrier permeability on day 3, 99mTechnetium-annexin V-128 (99mTc-Anx-V128), which indicated apoptosis on day 4, and 99mTechnetium-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime (99mTc-HMPAO), which indicated cerebral perfusion on day 5. Basilar artery narrowing was verified histologically, and cerebral TP receptor agonists were quantified.

RESULTS:

99mTc-DTPA uptake unveiled blood-brain barrier disruption in the SAH group. TBN mitigated this disruption in the brainstem area. 99mTc-Anx-V128 uptake was increased in the SAH group and TBN diminished this effect in the cerebellum. 99mTc-HMPAO uptake revealed a global decreased perfusion on day 5 in the SAH group that was significantly counteracted by TBN. TBN also mitigated basilar artery vasoconstriction, neurological deficits (on day 2), body weight loss (on day 5) and cerebral production of vasoconstrictors such as Thromboxane B2 and Prostaglandin F2α.

CONCLUSIONS:

Based on in vivo nanoscale imaging, we demonstrated that TBN protected against blood-brain barrier disruption, exerted an anti-apoptotic effect and improved cerebral perfusion. Thus, TP receptor antagonists showed promising results in treating post-haemorrhage neurovascular events.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; Blood brain barrier; Cerebral vasospasm; Single-photon emission computerized tomography; Subarachnoid haemorrhage; Thromboxane–prostaglandin receptor

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