Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Qual Life Res. 2019 Feb 9. doi: 10.1007/s11136-019-02115-x. [Epub ahead of print]

EQ-5D-Y-5L: developing a revised EQ-5D-Y with increased response categories.

Author information

1
Department of Health Economics and Health Care Management, School of Public Health, Bielefeld University, Universitätsstraße 25, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany. simone.kreimeier@uni-bielefeld.de.
2
Health Outcomes and Economic Evaluation Research Group, Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Equity and Health Policy Research Group, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Public Health and Medicine, Health-Promotion Interventions and Resilience, The Swedish Red Cross University College, 141 57, Huddinge, Sweden.
6
Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.
7
Office of Health Economics, London, UK.
8
Academic Unit of Health Economics, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
9
Centre for Health Economics, Management and Policy, Higher School of Economics, St Petersburg, Russia.
10
Department of Health Economics and Health Care Management, School of Public Health, Bielefeld University, Universitätsstraße 25, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

EQ-5D-Y is a generic measure of health status for children and adolescents aged 8-15 years. Originally, it has three levels of severity in each dimension (3L). This study aimed to develop a descriptive system of EQ-5D-Y with an increased number of severity levels and to test comprehensibility and feasibility.

METHODS:

The study was conducted in Germany, Spain, Sweden and the UK. In Phase 1, a review of existing instruments and focus group interviews were carried out to create a pool of possible labels for a modified severity classification. Participants aged 8-15 rated the severity of the identified labels in individual sorting and response scaling interviews. In Phase 2, preliminary 4L and 5L versions were constructed for further testing in cognitive interviews with healthy participants aged 8-15 years and children receiving treatment for a health condition.

RESULTS:

In Phase 1, a total of 233 labels was generated, ranging from 37 (UK) to 79 labels (Germany). Out of these, 7 to 16 possible labels for each dimension in the different languages were rated in 255 sorting and response scaling interviews. Labels covered an appropriate range of severity on the health continuum in all countries. In Phase 2, the 5L version was generally preferred (by 68-88% of the participants per country) over the 4L version.

CONCLUSIONS:

This multinational study has provided a version of the EQ-5D-Y with 5 severity levels in each dimension. This extended version (EQ-5D-Y-5L) requires testing its psychometric properties and its performance compared to that of the original EQ-5D-Y-3L.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Children; EQ-5D-Y; EQ-5D-Y-3L; EQ-5D-Y-5L; Health-related quality of life (HRQoL)

PMID:
30739287
DOI:
10.1007/s11136-019-02115-x

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center