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J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Feb;58(2):151-153. doi: 10.1016/j.jaac.2018.07.902. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Editorial: To Eat or Not to Eat: Advancing the Neuroscience of Hedonic Versus Controlled Eating Across Weight and Eating Disorders.

Author information

1
Division of Psychological and Social Medicine and Developmental Neurosciences, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany. Electronic address: transden.lab@uniklinikum-dresden.de.
2
Division of Psychological and Social Medicine and Developmental Neurosciences, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.

Abstract

Excessive weight and obesity, especially with childhood onset, is associated with long-term morbidity and mortality and places a major burden on the health care system. In the United States, 17% of children and adolescents are obese (32% overweight). By adulthood, the number rises to 34% or even 68% when also considering overweight individuals.1 Conventional nonsurgical treatments are often ineffective, and weight loss achieved with behaviorally oriented therapy programs is usually small (∼5%) and short-lived.2 A better understanding of the associated psychological mechanisms and their neurobiological underpinnings may allow for the development of more efficient, potentially brain-based, therapeutic interventions. A growing number of human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies point to alterations in reward-related corticostriatal circuity and the hypothalamus, a key area in energy homeostasis.3 Recent studies have analyzed resting state functional connectivity (rsFC), a technique sensitive to changes in the interaction between distant brain regions, which is particularly advantageous in clinical samples, as it requires little compliance and as scanning time is relatively short.

PMID:
30738539
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaac.2018.07.902

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