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Nat Commun. 2019 Feb 8;10(1):653. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-08552-z.

Megahertz-wave-transmitting conducting polymer electrode for device-to-device integration.

Kim T1,2, Kim G1,2, Kim H1, Yoon HJ3, Kim T3, Jun Y3, Shin TH4,5, Kang S6, Cheon J4,5,7, Hwang D3, Min BW3, Shim W8,9,10,11.

Author information

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea.
2
Center for Multi-Dimensional Materials, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea.
3
School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea.
4
Yonsei-IBS Institute, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea.
5
Center for NanoMedicine, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Seoul, 03722, Korea.
6
School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea.
7
Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea.
8
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea. wshim@yonsei.ac.kr.
9
Center for Multi-Dimensional Materials, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea. wshim@yonsei.ac.kr.
10
Yonsei-IBS Institute, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Korea. wshim@yonsei.ac.kr.
11
Center for NanoMedicine, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Seoul, 03722, Korea. wshim@yonsei.ac.kr.

Abstract

The ideal combination of high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity, especially at very low frequencies of less than the gigahertz (GHz) order, such as the radiofrequencies at which electronic devices operate (tens of kHz to hundreds of GHz), is fundamental incompatibility, which creates a barrier to the realization of enhanced user interfaces and 'device-to-device integration.' Herein, we present a design strategy for preparing a megahertz (MHz)-transparent conductor, based on a plasma frequency controlled by the electrical conductivity, with the ultimate goal of device-to-device integration through electromagnetic wave transmittance. This approach is verified experimentally using a conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), the microstructure of which is manipulated by employing a solution process. The use of a transparent conducting polymer as an electrode enables the fabrication of a fully functional touch-controlled display device and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible biomedical monitoring device, which would open up a new paradigm for transparent conductors.

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