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J Clin Sleep Med. 2019 Feb 15;15(2):201-206. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.7616.

Associations Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Measures of Arterial Stiffness.

Author information

1
Centre for Sleep and Chronobiology (CIRUS), Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2
Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala, Sweden.
3
School of Psychology, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
4
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales, Australia.
5
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
6
Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Los Angeles, California.
7
Sleep Research Group, Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to determine whether severity measures of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are associated with arterial stiffness and central blood pressure (two important cardiovascular risk factors) in a large group of patients with OSA.

METHODS:

Baseline data from six studies on OSA in which arterial stiffness and central aortic blood pressure measures were determined using applanation tonometry were pooled. Associations between measures of arterial stiffness (heart rate corrected augmentation index [AI75]), central aortic blood pressure (central systolic pressure [CSP] and heart rate corrected central augmentation pressure [CAP75]) and measures of OSA severity were explored using stepwise regression modelling.

RESULTS:

Data from 362 participants (M:F ratio 13:1) with mean (standard deviation) age 49.2 (11.0) years, body mass index 31.9 (5.3) kg/m2, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 35.7 (20.7) events/h were included in the analyses. The AHI, oxygen desaturation index (ODI3%), and sleep time with SpO2 < 90% (T90) were all associated with arterial stiffness (AI75), (AHI: adj. β = .069; P = .01; ODI3%: adj. β = .072; P = .01; T90: adj. β = .18; P < .0001) and CAP75 (AHI: adj. β = .030; P = .01; ODI3%: adj. β = .027; P = .02; T90: adj. β = .080; P < .0001). AHI was also associated with CSP (AHI: adj. β = .11; P = .002).

CONCLUSIONS:

OSA severity was significantly associated with augmentation index and CAP75 although the relationships were not strong.

KEYWORDS:

arterial stiffness; obstructive sleep apnea; patient cohort

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