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Sensors (Basel). 2019 Feb 6;19(3). pii: E657. doi: 10.3390/s19030657.

The Use of Wearable Sensors for the Movement Assessment on Muscle Contraction Sequences in Post-Stroke Patients during Sit-to-Stand.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan. wchsu@mail.ntust.edu.tw.
2
Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan. wchsu@mail.ntust.edu.tw.
3
National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 11490, Taiwan. wchsu@mail.ntust.edu.tw.
4
Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan. D10422205@mail.ntust.edu.tw.
5
Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan. D10422205@mail.ntust.edu.tw.
6
Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan. jiajia527@gmail.com.
7
Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 11490, Taiwan. fuji-yang@yahoo.com.tw.
8
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan. 08168@s.tmu.edu.tw.
9
School of Gerontology Health Management, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan. 08168@s.tmu.edu.tw.
10
Department of Neurosurgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 11490, Taiwan. choukuannien@gmail.com.

Abstract

Electromyography (EMG) sensors have been used to study the sequence of muscle contractions during sit-to-stand (STS) in post-stroke patients. However, the majority of the studies used wired sensors with a limited number of placements. Using the latest improved wearable technology with 16 sensors, the current study was a thorough investigation to evaluate the contraction sequences of eight key muscles on the trunk and bilateral limbs during STS in post-stroke patients, as it became feasible. Multiple wearable sensors for the detection of muscle contraction sequences showed that the post-stroke patients performed STS with abnormal firing sequences, not only in the primary mover on the sagittal plane during raising, but also in the tibialis anterior, which may affect anticipatory postural adjustment in the gluteus medius, which may affect balance control. The abnormal tibialis anterior contraction until the early ascending phase and the delayed firing of the gluteus muscles highlight the importance of whole-kinetic-chain monitoring of contraction sequences using wearable sensors. The findings can be helpful for the design of therapeutic exercises.

KEYWORDS:

contraction of the muscles; electromyography signal; sit-to-stand; stroke; wearable sensors

PMID:
30736269
PMCID:
PMC6387101
DOI:
10.3390/s19030657
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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