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Am J Hum Genet. 2019 Feb 7;104(2):193-196. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.01.011.

Optimal Integration of Behavioral Medicine into Clinical Genetics and Genomics.

Author information

1
Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: kleinwm@mail.nih.gov.
2
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address: colleen.marie.mcbride@emory.edu.
3
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
4
Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA.
5
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA 92039, USA.
6
Department of Communication and Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.
7
Genomic Medicine Institute, Geisinger, Danville, PA 17822, USA.
8
Department of Community Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

Abstract

Clinical genetics and genomics will exert their greatest population impact by leveraging the rich knowledge of human behavior that is central to the discipline of behavioral medicine. We contend that more concerted efforts are needed to integrate these fields synergistically, and accordingly, we consider barriers and potential actions to hasten such integration.

PMID:
30735659
PMCID:
PMC6369539
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.01.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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