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Am J Surg. 2019 Jan 21. pii: S0002-9610(18)30888-2. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.01.010. [Epub ahead of print]

Medical students' perceptions and motivations prior to their surgery clerkship.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street GRB 425, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: skmckinley@partners.org.
2
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street GRB 425, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: mkochis@mgh.harvard.edu.
3
Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street GRB 425, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: ccooper1@mgh.harvard.edu.
4
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street GRB 425, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: nsaillant@partners.org.
5
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street GRB 425, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: abhaynes@mgh.harvard.edu.
6
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street GRB 425, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: epetrusa@mgh.harvard.edu.
7
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street GRB 425, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: rphitayakorn@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aims to determine the effect of a pre-clerkship workshop on medical students' perceptions of surgery and surgeons and to describe their concerns and learning goals.

METHODS:

Thirty-nine medical students completed surveys before and after a workshop preceding their surgery clerkship. Quantitative data and free responses that were inductively coded were used to assess effectiveness.

RESULTS:

Perceptions from 38 students (response rate = 97.4%) significantly improved for 11 of 21 items. At pre-workshop, the most frequently cited learning goals were improving technical skills (58%), surgical knowledge (53%), and understanding surgical culture and work (53%). Students' top concerns were meeting clerkship demands (68%) and being evaluated (55%). After the workshop, student learning objectives and concerns remained largely unchanged.

CONCLUSIONS:

A pre-clerkship workshop improved student perceptions of surgery and surgeons. Understanding students' intrinsic motivations may facilitate future clerkship curriculum improvement via better alignment of educator and student goals and objectives.

KEYWORDS:

Clerkship; Clinical education; Medical students; Transition; Undergraduate medical education

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