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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Feb 4. pii: S0190-9622(19)30195-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2019.01.084. [Epub ahead of print]

Coffee, tea, caffeine, and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in a Chinese population: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. Electronic address: oh.choon.chiat@singhealth.com.sg.
2
Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
3
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
4
Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore; Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore. Electronic address: oh.choon.chiat@singhealth.com.sg.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

While epidemiological studies in populations of European-descent suggest possible chemo-protective effect of caffeine against non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), data in Asian populations are lacking.

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the relations between coffee, tea and caffeine consumption, and NMSC risk among Chinese in Singapore.

METHODS:

We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 men and women aged 45-74 years at recruitment from 1993 to 1998. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazard models.

RESULTS:

Coffee drinking was associated with reduced NMSC risk in a dose-dependent manner (P trend<0.0001); compared with those who drank coffee less than weekly, in those who drank ≥3 cups/day, HRs (95% CIs) were 0.54 (0.31-0.93) for risk of basal cell carcinoma, and 0.33 (0.13-0.84) for risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Compared with non-drinkers, daily drinkers of black tea also had reduced NMSC risk (HR=0.70; 95% CI=0.52-0.94). Caffeine intake reduced NMSC risk in a stepwise manner (P trend=0.0025); subjects with caffeine intake ≥400 mg/day had the lowest risk (HR=0.59; 95% CI=0.34-1.04).

CONCLUSION:

Consumption of caffeinated drinks such as coffee and black tea may reduce the risk of NMSC among Chinese.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese; caffeine; coffee; non-melanoma skin cancer; tea

PMID:
30731173
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2019.01.084

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