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Parasite. 2019;26:5. doi: 10.1051/parasite/2019005. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Molecular identification of Wolbachia and Sodalis glossinidius in the midgut of Glossina fuscipes quanzensis from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Author information

1
Molecular Parasitology and Entomology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, PO Box 67, Dschang, Cameroon.
2
Institute of Health and Society, Université Catholique de Louvain, Clos Chapelle-aux-Champs 30, 1200 Woluwe-Saint-Lambert, Brussels, Belgium - Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nationalestraat 155, 2000, Antwerp, Belgium.
3
Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé I, PO Box 812 Yaoundé, Cameroon.
4
Mission Spéciale d'Eradication des Glossines, Division Régionale Tsé-Tsé Adamaoua, PO Box 263 Ngaoundéré, Cameroon.
5
Institut national de recherche biomédicale Kinshasa, Avenue de la démocratie N°5345, Gombe, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.
6
UMR 177, IRD-CIRAD, CIRAD TA A-17/G, Campus International de Baillarguet, Montpellier Cedex 5, France - Center for Research on Filariasis and other Tropical Diseases (CRFILMT), PO Box 5797 Yaoundé, Cameroon - University of Yaoundé I, Faculty of Science, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
7
Institut national de recherche biomédicale Kinshasa, Avenue de la démocratie N°5345, Gombe, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo - Department of Tropical Medicine, University of Kinshasa, B.P. 127 Kinshasa XI, Democratic Republic of Congo.

Abstract

During the last 30 years, investigations on the microbiome of different tsetse species have generated substantial data on the bacterial flora of these cyclical vectors of African trypanosomes, with the overarching goal of improving the control of trypanosomiases. It is in this context that the presence of Wolbachia and Sodalis glossinidius was studied in wild populations of Glossina fuscipes quanzensis from the Democratic Republic of Congo. Tsetse flies were captured with pyramidal traps. Of the 700 Glossina f. quanzensis captured, 360 were dissected and their midguts collected and analyzed. Sodalis glossinidius and Wolbachia were identified by PCR. The Wolbachia-positive samples were genetically characterized with five molecular markers. PCR revealed 84.78% and 15.55% midguts infected by Wolbachia and S. glossinidius, respectively. The infection rates varied according to capture sites. Of the five molecular markers used to characterize Wolbachia, only the fructose bis-phosphate aldolase gene was amplified for about 60% of midguts previously found with Wolbachia infections. The sequencing results confirmed the presence of Wolbachia and revealed the presence of S. glossinidius in the midgut of Glossina f. quanzensis. A low level of midguts were naturally co-infected by both bacteria. The data generated in this study open a framework for investigations aimed at understanding the contribution of these symbiotic microorganisms to the vectorial competence of Glossina fuscipes quanzensis.

PMID:
30729921
DOI:
10.1051/parasite/2019005
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