Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Oral Microbiol. 2019 Jan 28;11(1):1563409. doi: 10.1080/20002297.2018.1563409. eCollection 2019.

Tongue coating microbiome data distinguish patients with pancreatic head cancer from healthy controls.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, P.R. China.
2
Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-Organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, P.R. China.
3
Department of Infectious Diseases; Precision Medicine Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Zhejiang, P.R.China.
4
Department of Geriatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, P.R. China.
5
Health Management Center, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

Abstract

Background: The microbiota plays a critical role in the process of human carcinogenesis. Pancreatic head carcinoma (PHC)-associated tongue coating microbiome dysbiosis has not yet been clearly defined.Objective: Our aim is to reveal the bacterial composition shifts in the microbiota of the tongue coat of PHC patients.Design: The tongue coating microbiota was analyzed in 30 PHC patients and 25 healthy controls using 16S rRNA gene sequencing technology.Results: The microbiome diversity of the tongue coat in PHC patients was significantly increased, as shown by the Shannon, Simpson, inverse Simpson, Obs and incidence-based coverage estimators. Principal component analysis revealed that PHC patients were colonized by remarkably different tongue coating microbiota than healthy controls and liver cancer patients. Linear discriminant analysis effect size revealed that Leptotrichia, Fusobacterium,Rothia, Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, Atopobium, Peptostreptococcus, Catonella, Oribacterium, Filifactor, Campylobacter, Moraxella and Tannerella were overrepresented in the tongue coating of PHC patients, and Haemophilus, Porphyromonas and Paraprevotella were enriched in the tongue coating microbiota of healthy controls. Strikingly, Haemophilus, Porphyromonas, Leptotrichia and Fusobacterium could distinguish PHC patients from healthy subjects, and Streptococcus and SR1 could distinguish PHC patients from liver cancer patients. Conclusions: These findings identified the microbiota dysbiosis of the tongue coat in PHC patients, and provide insight into the association between the human microbiome and pancreatic cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Miseq sequencing; Pancreatic head carcinoma; microbiome dysbiosis; tongue coat

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center