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Mov Disord. 2019 Feb 6. doi: 10.1002/mds.27619. [Epub ahead of print]

Sensitivity and Specificity of Diagnostic Criteria for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
3
Unniversity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
4
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, USA.
7
Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
8
Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 2017, the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society put forward new clinical criteria for the diagnosis of PSP, recognizing diverse PSP phenotypes. In this study, we compared the sensitivity and specificity of the new criteria with the National Institutes of Neurological Disease and Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy criteria at different times.

METHODS:

Patients with clinical parkinsonism, clinical and/or neuropathological diagnosis of PSP, were identified from the Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy brain bank. All patients had neuropathologic diagnoses and detailed clinical examination performed by a neurologist at 1 of the 3 Mayo Clinic sites, in Florida, Arizona, and Minnesota. Clinical symptoms and signs were abstracted retrospectively in a blinded fashion and used to determine whether patients met either diagnostic criterion. Patients were divided into early and late disease stage groups using a 3-year cutoff.

RESULTS:

A total of 129 patients were included, of whom 66 had PSP pathology (51%). The remainder had other neurodegenerative diseases. The overall sensitivity of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society criteria was 87.9%, compared with 45.5% for the National Institutes of Neurological Disease and Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy criteria, whereas the specificity of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society probable PSP criteria was 85.7%, compared with 90.5% for the National Institutes of Neurological Disease and Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Individual patients were noted to have features of multiple PSP phenotypes.

CONCLUSION:

The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society criteria recognize several phenotypes of progressive supranuclear palsy and hence have higher sensitivity than the previous criteria. © 2019 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

KEYWORDS:

MDS-PSP; NINDS-SPSP; PSP diagnostic criteria; progressive supranuclear palsy

PMID:
30726566
DOI:
10.1002/mds.27619

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