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Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther. 2019;51(1):21-34. doi: 10.5603/AIT.a2019.0003. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Epileptiform EEG patterns during different techniques of induction of general anaesthesia with sevoflurane and propofol: a randomised trial.

Author information

1
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland. mstasiowski.anest@gmail.com.
2
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland.
3
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical University of Silesia, SMK in Katowice, Poland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of the study was to assess the influence of volatile induction of general anaesthesia with sevoflurane using two different techniques and intravenous anaesthesia with propofol on the possible presence of epileptiform electroencephalograph patterns during the induction of general anaesthesia.

METHODS:

Sixty patients (age 18-70 years) were recruited. Exclusion criteria included history of epilepsy, neurological or neurosurgical diseases, pre-existing EPs in initial EEG recordings, medication interfering with EEG patterns. Patients were randomly allocated into three different groups: A (sevoflurane, increasing concentrations technique); B (sevoflurane, vital capacity technique); C (intravenous propofol). The clinical and instrumental monitoring included arterial blood pressure, heart rate, standard electrocardiography II, arterial oxygen saturation, facial electromyography, fraction of inspired sevoflurane, fraction of expired sevoflurane, minimal alveolar concentration of sevoflurane, and BIS.

RESULTS:

Neurophysiological analysis of EEGs showed different EPs: polyspikes (PS), rhythmic polyspikes (PSR), and periodic epileptiform discharges (PED). EPs (p < 0.05) were observed in Group A (56%) and Group B (37%), but not in Group C. One patient in group B presented with clinical seizures. No significant differences in the vital parameters and anaesthesia parameters between groups was observed, regardless of the presence of EPs, which were associated with both low and more likely high (falsely indicating awakening from anaesthesia) BIS scores.

CONCLUSION:

Our study shows that the BIS score variations do not detect epileptiform activity, which was associated with both low and high scores. The sevoflurane concentration reached either sedative or toxic concentrations.

KEYWORDS:

anaesthesia; anaesthetics; bispectral index; electroencephalogram; epileptiform patterns; intravenous; monitoring; propofol; sevoflurane; volatile

PMID:
30723886
DOI:
10.5603/AIT.a2019.0003

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