Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Oncoimmunology. 2018 Dec 13;8(3):1548242. doi: 10.1080/2162402X.2018.1548242. eCollection 2019.

Commentary: preclinical efficacy of immune-checkpoint monotherapy does not recapitulate corresponding biomarkers-based clinical predictions in glioblastoma by Garg et al. (2017).

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine-Biostatistics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
4
Department of Microbiology-Immunology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
5
Department of Urology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
6
Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
8
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
9
Department of Medicine-Division of Hematology and Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

Preclinical modeling and gene expression analyses have yielded distinct observations for the role of immune checkpoint, IDO1, in glioblastoma (GBM). Accordingly, our recent work differs with Garg et al. (2017) with respect to IDO1 among preclinical and bioinformatic GBM datasets. Here, we discuss the methodological differences that affected study interpretation, and potentially, future clinical decision-making for IDO1-targeting approaches against GBM.

KEYWORDS:

IDO; Treg; brain tumor; glioblastoma; immunosuppression; immunotherapy

PMID:
30723577
PMCID:
PMC6350838
[Available on 2019-12-13]
DOI:
10.1080/2162402X.2018.1548242

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center