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MBio. 2019 Feb 5;10(1). pii: e02624-18. doi: 10.1128/mBio.02624-18.

Dopamine Is a Siderophore-Like Iron Chelator That Promotes Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence in Mice.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine II (Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Rheumatology and Pneumology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
2
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Iron Metabolism and Anemia Research, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
3
Division of Microbiology and Hygiene, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
4
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.
6
Department of Internal Medicine II (Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Rheumatology and Pneumology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria guenter.weiss@i-med.ac.at.

Abstract

We have recently shown that the catecholamine dopamine regulates cellular iron homeostasis in macrophages. As iron is an essential nutrient for microbes, and intracellular iron availability affects the growth of intracellular bacteria, we studied whether dopamine administration impacts the course of Salmonella infections. Dopamine was found to promote the growth of Salmonella both in culture and within bone marrow-derived macrophages, which was dependent on increased bacterial iron acquisition. Dopamine administration to mice infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium resulted in significantly increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen, as well as reduced survival. The promotion of bacterial growth by dopamine was independent of the siderophore-binding host peptide lipocalin-2. Rather, dopamine enhancement of iron uptake requires both the histidine sensor kinase QseC and bacterial iron transporters, in particular SitABCD, and may also involve the increased expression of bacterial iron uptake genes. Deletion or pharmacological blockade of QseC reduced but did not abolish the growth-promoting effects of dopamine. Dopamine also modulated systemic iron homeostasis by increasing hepcidin expression and depleting macrophages of the iron exporter ferroportin, which enhanced intracellular bacterial growth. Salmonella lacking all central iron uptake pathways failed to benefit from dopamine treatment. These observations are potentially relevant to critically ill patients, in whom the pharmacological administration of catecholamines to improve circulatory performance may exacerbate the course of infection with siderophilic bacteria.IMPORTANCE Here we show that dopamine increases bacterial iron incorporation and promotes Salmonella Typhimurium growth both in vitro and in vivo These observations suggest the potential hazards of pharmacological catecholamine administration in patients with bacterial sepsis but also suggest that the inhibition of bacterial iron acquisition might provide a useful approach to antimicrobial therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Salmonella Typhimurium; catecholamine; dopamine; iron; qseC ; sepsis

PMID:
30723125
PMCID:
PMC6428752
DOI:
10.1128/mBio.02624-18
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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