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Seizure. 2019 Feb;65:166-171. doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2019.01.003. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Seizure outcome and epilepsy patterns in patients with cerebral palsy.

Author information

1
Neurology Unit, Paediatrics Department, Mansoura University Children Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt. Electronic address: nohatharwat123@mans.edu.eg.
2
Neurology Unit, Paediatrics Department, Mansoura University Children Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of the present study was to investigate epilepsy patterns and outcomes in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) and identify the variables that determine remission.

METHODS:

This was a retrospective cohort study. We followed 107 CP patients aged 1-16 years with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The patients were categorized according to their remission outcome, uninterrupted freedom of seizure for 2 years or longer, and 4 epilepsy patterns: A) sustained freedom from seizures before 6 months of treatment; B) delayed but sustained seizure freedom; C) relapsing-remitting course; and D) seizure freedom never attained. The variables were analysed for their prognostic relevance to the outcomes RESULTS: A total of 107 patients were included; their mean age at epilepsy diagnosis was 4.2 years (SD 2.5). By the end of the 8-year follow up, 19.6% 26.1%, 31.7%, and 22.4% were in sustained remission, terminal remission, relapse, and no remission respectively. Pattern A was identified in 6.5% of the patients, pattern B in 27.1%, pattern C in 43.9%, and pattern Din 22.4%. Univariate analysis revealed that the type of CP, mobility, and number of seizure types, are among the other factors that significantly affected remission.

CONCLUSION:

A total of 45% of patients with CP and epilepsy achieved remission (with and without antiepileptics) but after a relatively long treatment duration. Remission was affected by patient- and epilepsy-related factors. More studies are required to further evaluate these factors.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral palsy; Epilepsy; Outcome; Patterns

PMID:
30721873
DOI:
10.1016/j.seizure.2019.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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