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Vaccines (Basel). 2019 Feb 4;7(1). pii: E17. doi: 10.3390/vaccines7010017.

Immunogenicity and Immune Memory after a Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Booster in a High-Risk Population Primed with 10-Valent or 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Papua New Guinean Children.

Author information

1
Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia. Anita.vandenbiggelaar@telethonkids.org.au.
2
Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. Anita.vandenbiggelaar@telethonkids.org.au.
3
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. william.pomat@pngimr.org.pg.
4
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. geraldine.masiria@pngimr.org.pg.
5
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. numbocquio@gmail.com.
6
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. birunu.nivio@pngimr.org.pg.
7
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. jacintafrancis@gmail.com.
8
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. rebecca.ford@pngimr.org.pg.
9
School of Public Health, University Centre for Rural Health (USRH), The University of Sydney, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia. megan.passey@sydney.edu.au.
10
Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia. lea-ann.kirkham@uwa.edu.au.
11
School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. lea-ann.kirkham@uwa.edu.au.
12
Centre for Biostatistics, Telethon Kids Institute, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. peter.jacoby@telethonkids.org.au.
13
Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia. deborah.lehmann@telethonkids.org.au.
14
Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia. peter.richmond@uwa.edu.au.
15
Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. peter.richmond@uwa.edu.au.

Abstract

We investigated the immunogenicity, seroprotection rates and persistence of immune memory in young children at high risk of pneumococcal disease in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Children were primed with 10-valent (PCV10) or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV13) at 1, 2 and 3 months of age and randomized at 9 months to receive PPV (PCV10/PPV-vaccinated, n = 51; PCV13/PPV-vaccinated, n = 52) or no PPV (PCV10/PPV-naive, n = 57; PCV13/PPV-naive, n = 48). All children received a micro-dose of PPV at 23 months of age to study the capacity to respond to a pneumococcal challenge. PPV vaccination resulted in significantly increased IgG responses (1.4 to 10.5-fold change) at 10 months of age for all PPV-serotypes tested. Both PPV-vaccinated and PPV-naive children responded to the 23-month challenge and post-challenge seroprotection rates (IgG ≥ 0.35 μg/mL) were similar in the two groups (80⁻100% for 12 of 14 tested vaccine serotypes). These findings show that PPV is immunogenic in 9-month-old children at high risk of pneumococcal infections and does not affect the capacity to produce protective immune responses. Priming with currently available PCVs followed by a PPV booster in later infancy could offer improved protection to young children at high risk of severe pneumococcal infections caused by a broad range of serotypes.

Conflict of interest statement

W.S.P. has received funding from Pfizer Australia to attend a conference. A.H.J.v.d.B. was previously an employee of Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Johnson and Johnson, and conducts part-time consultancy work for vaccine companies on projects not related to this study. L.-A.K. has received educational grants and travel support from Pfizer and GSK to attend conferences, is an investigator on an investigator-initiated research grant funded by Pfizer Australia and is an inventor on patents for a pneumococcal protein vaccine antigen. D.L. has received support from Pfizer Australia to attend conferences, an honorarium from Merck Vaccines to give a seminar at their offices in Pennsylvania and support from Merck Vaccines to attend a conference; and is an investigator on an investigator-initiated research grant that was funded by Pfizer Australia. P.R. has received non-financial support from Pfizer, grants from GlaxoSmithKline, grants from Pfizer, and non-financial support from GlaxoSmithKline for work outside the submitted work. The Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research received sponsorship from Pfizer Australia to host a national Medical Symposium in 2014. All other authors declare no competing interests. The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.

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