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Nat Rev Clin Oncol. 2019 Jul;16(7):442-458. doi: 10.1038/s41571-019-0169-5.

The beginning of the end for conventional RECIST - novel therapies require novel imaging approaches.

Author information

1
Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
2
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
3
Department of Medicine A, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
4
DFG Cluster of Excellence EXC 1003 'Cells in Motion', Muenster, Germany.
5
Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Randall Division & Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, London, UK.
6
Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany. moritz.wildgruber@ukmuenster.de.
7
DFG Cluster of Excellence EXC 1003 'Cells in Motion', Muenster, Germany. moritz.wildgruber@ukmuenster.de.

Abstract

Owing to improvements in our understanding of the biological principles of tumour initiation and progression, a wide variety of novel targeted therapies have been developed. Developments in biomedical imaging, however, have not kept pace with these improvements and are still mainly designed to determine lesion size alone, which is reflected in the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Imaging approaches currently used for the evaluation of treatment responses in patients with solid tumours, therefore, often fail to detect successful responses to novel targeted agents and might even falsely suggest disease progression, a scenario known as pseudoprogression. The ability to differentiate between responders and nonresponders early in the course of treatment is essential to allowing the early adjustment of treatment regimens. Various imaging approaches targeting a single dedicated tumour feature, as described in the hallmarks of cancer, have been successful in preclinical investigations, and some have been evaluated in pilot clinical trials. However, these approaches have largely not been implemented in clinical practice. In this Review, we describe current biomedical imaging approaches used to monitor responses to treatment in patients receiving novel targeted therapies, including a summary of the most promising future approaches and how these might improve clinical practice.

PMID:
30718844
DOI:
10.1038/s41571-019-0169-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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