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Sci Rep. 2019 Feb 4;9(1):1338. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-37995-5.

Mean diffusivity related to collectivism among university students in Japan.

Author information

1
Division of Psychiatry, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sendai, Japan. seishu.nakagawa.e8@tohoku.ac.jp.
2
Department of Human Brain Science, Institute of Development, Ageing and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. seishu.nakagawa.e8@tohoku.ac.jp.
3
Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Ageing and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
4
Division of Medical Neuroimaging Analysis, Department of Community Medical Supports, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
5
Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Development, Ageing and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
6
Creative Interdisciplinary Research Division, Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Science (FRIS), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
7
Smart Ageing International Research Center, Institute of Development, Ageing and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
8
Department of Human Brain Science, Institute of Development, Ageing and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
9
Department of Behavioral Medicine, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan.
10
Department of Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.
11
School of Medicine, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan.
12
ADVANTAGE Risk Management Co., Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
13
Department of Language Sciences, Graduate School of Humanities, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, Japan.
14
Department of Sport Science, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.
15
Advanced Brain Science, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
16
Graduate School of International Cultural Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.

Abstract

Collectivism is an important factor for coping with stress in one's social life. To date, no imaging studies have revealed a direct association between collectivism and white matter structure. Collectivism is positively related to independence, harm avoidance, rejection sensitivity, cooperativeness, external locus of control, and self-monitoring and negatively related to need for uniqueness. Accordingly, we hypothesised that the neural structures underpinning collectivism are those that are also involved with its relationship using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aimed to identify the brain structures associated with collectivism in healthy young adults (n = 797), using regional grey and white matter volume, fractional anisotropy, and mean diffusivity (MD) analyses of MRI data. Scores on the collectivism scale were positively associated with MD values in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, ventral posterior cingulate cortex, globus pallidus, and calcarine cortex using the threshold-free cluster enhancement method with family-wise errors corrected to P < 0.05 at the whole-brain level. No significant associations between were found collectivism and other measures. Thus, the present findings supported our hypothesis that the neural correlates of collectivism are situated in regions involved in its related factors.

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