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Ann Nutr Metab. 2019 Feb 4;74(2):132-139. doi: 10.1159/000496427. [Epub ahead of print]

Effect of Delivery Mode and Nutrition on Gut Microbiota in Neonates.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan.
2
Department of Neonatology, Izumiotsu Municipal Hospital, Izumiotsu, Osaka, Japan.
3
Department of Legal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japankanekok@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

The mode of delivery (vaginal or cesarean section) and feeding type (breastfeeding or formula feeding) of neonates are considered the most influential factors in the development of gut microbiota.

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigated the effect of prebiotic-rich breast milk on overcoming gut microbiota dysbiosis.

METHOD:

Stool samples from 36 healthy Japanese neonates were obtained at 4 days and 1 month of age, and divided into 4 groups based on mode of delivery and feeding type. The gut microbiota composition and bacterial diversity were assessed using 16S rRNA sequencing.

RESULTS:

At 4 days old, vaginally delivered neonates had a significantly higher diversity of bacteria than those born by cesarean section. Bacteroidales and Enterobacteriales were overrepresented in vaginally delivered neonates (p = 0.0031 and p = 0.011), while Bacillales and Lactobacillales were overrepresented in caesarean section delivered neonates (p = 0.012 and p = 0.0016). However, there was little difference in bacterial diversity and bacterial relative abundance at 1 month of age between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cesarean section delivery appeared to reduce the diversity of neonate gut microbiota, resulting in dysbiosis, but this improved to the equivalent level seen in vaginally delivered infants by 1 month of age. Breastfeeding, even for short periods, may therefore improve neonate gut dysbiosis.

KEYWORDS:

16S rRNA gene sequencing; Diversity; Dysbiosis; Gut microbiota; Mode of delivery

PMID:
30716730
DOI:
10.1159/000496427

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