Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Fish Shellfish Immunol. 2019 Feb 1;87:546-558. doi: 10.1016/j.fsi.2019.01.056. [Epub ahead of print]

Vitamin A deficiency impairs intestinal physical barrier function of fish.

Author information

1
Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, 611130, China; Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, 611130, China; Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, 611130, China.
2
Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, 611130, China.
3
Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Academy of Animal Science, Chengdu, 610066, China.
4
Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430072, China.
5
Guangzhou Cohoo Bio-tech Research & Development Centre, Guangzhou, 510663, Guangdong, China.
6
Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, 611130, China; Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, 611130, China; Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, 611130, China. Electronic address: fenglin@sicau.edu.cn.

Abstract

The present study was the first to investigate the effects of dietary vitamin A (VA) on the intestinal physical barrier function associated with oxidation, antioxidant system, apoptosis and cell-cellular tight junction (TJ) in the proximal (PI), mid (MI) and distal (DI) intestines of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Fish were fed graded levels of dietary VA for 10 weeks, and then a challenge test using an injection of Aeromonas hydrophila was conducted for 14 days. Results indicated that dietary VA deficiency caused oxidative damage to fish intestine partly by the reduced non-enzymatic antioxidant components glutathione (GSH) and VA contents as well as reduced antioxidant enzyme activities [not including manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)]. Further results observed that the decreased antioxidant enzyme activities by VA deficiency were partly related to the down-regulation of their corresponding mRNA levels which were regulated by the down-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels and up-regulation of kelch-like-ECH-associated protein (Keap1a) (rather than Keap1b) mRNA levels in three intestinal segments of fish. Meanwhile, VA deficiency up-regulated the mRNA levels of the apoptosis signalling [caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 (rather than caspase-7)] associated with the inhibition of the target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathway in three intestinal segments of fish. Additionally, VA deficiency decreased the mRNA levels of TJ complexes [claudin-b, claudin-c, claudin-3, claudin-12, claudin-15a, occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) in the PI, MI and DI, as well as claudin-7 and claudin-11a in the MI and DI] linked to the up-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) signalling. These results suggested that VA deficiency impaired structural integrity in three intestinal segments of fish. Meanwhile, excessive VA also showed similar negative effects on these indexes. Taken together, the current study firstly demonstrated that VA deficiency impaired physical barrier functions associated with impaired antioxidant capacity, aggravated cell apoptosis and disrupted TJ complexes in the PI, MI and DI, but different segments performed different actions in fish. Based on protecting fish against protein oxidation, the optimal VA levels for grass carp were estimated to be 2622 IU/kg diet.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidant capacity; Apoptosis protein; Intestinal segment; Physical barrier; Vitamin A

PMID:
30716522
DOI:
10.1016/j.fsi.2019.01.056

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center