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Environ Int. 2019 Jul;128:446-456. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2019.01.021. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Early-life triclosan exposure and parent-reported behavior problems in 8-year-old children.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, United States of America. Electronic address: medina_jackson-browne@brown.edu.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Brown University, Providence, RI, United States of America.
3
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America.
5
British Columbia Children's Hospital and the Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Triclosan exposure may decrease circulating thyroxine levels or cause neuron apoptosis, which in turn may adversely affect neurodevelopment. However, few studies have examined the association of early life triclosan exposure with child behavior.

OBJECTIVE:

To quantify the association between early-life triclosan exposure and child behavior at age 8-years in 202 mother-child pairs from the HOME study (Cincinnati, OH; enrolled: 2003-2006).

METHODS:

We quantified urinary triclosan concentrations up to 3 times in mothers (16-weeks, 26-weeks, and delivery) and up to 6 times in children (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 years). Parents rated children's problem behaviors at age 8-years using the Behavioral Assessment System for Children-2 (BASC-2). Adjusting for covariates and accounting for exposure measurement error, we estimated changes in behavior problem scores per 10-fold increase in mean gestational and childhood triclosan concentrations. In addition, we estimated sex-specific associations.

RESULTS:

Child sex modified the association of gestational and childhood triclosan with several BASC-2 scales (sex × triclosan p-values < 0.2). In boys, increasing gestational triclosan was associated with higher behavioral symptom index (β: 4.5; 95% CI: 1.0, 8.1), externalizing problems (β: 5.0; 95% CI: 1.2, 9.0), attention problem (β: 6.6; 95% CI: 2.4, 11), hyperactivity (β: 6.4; 95% CI: 2.1, 11), and somatization (β: 3.8; 95% CI: 0.3, 7.3) scores. In contrast, triclosan-BASC-2 associations in girls were generally null and not statistically significant. We observed similar patterns of associations between childhood triclosan and these same behavioral scores; however, their magnitude decreased substantially after adjusting for gestational triclosan and associations were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSION:

In this cohort, increasing gestational and childhood urinary triclosan concentrations were associated with higher behavior problem scores in 8-year old boys, but not girls.

KEYWORDS:

Child behavior; Childhood; Epidemiology; Neurodevelopment; Pregnancy; Triclosan

PMID:
30712883
PMCID:
PMC6526084
[Available on 2020-07-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2019.01.021
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