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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2019 Feb;122(2):198-203.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.anai.2018.10.022. Epub 2018 Oct 27.

Associations of unsafe, unsupportive, and underdeveloped neighborhoods with atopic dermatitis in US children.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
2
Departments of Dermatology, Preventive Medicine, and Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary Eczema Center, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: JonathanISilverberg@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is influenced by multiple emotional and environmental factors. Yet, little is known about the impact of neighborhood environment characteristics on AD.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the association of neighborhood characteristics with AD prevalence and severity in US children.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from the 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health, including a representative sample of 79,667 children and adolescents (age 0-17 years) in the United States. Multivariable weighted logistic regression models that adjusted for sociodemographics were constructed to determine the associations of neighborhood characteristics with AD prevalence and severity.

RESULTS:

Atopic dermatitis prevalence or severity were significantly increased in children residing in neighborhoods where people reportedly definitely do not help each other out (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.32 [1.15-1.52]), watch out for each other's children (1.26 [1.10-1.45] and 1.66 [1.14-2.41], respectively), have people to count on (1.28 [1.13-1.45]), and trusted adults to help the child (1.16 [1.01-1.32] and 1.54 [1.05-2.27], respectively). Children also had increased odds of AD if their caregiver felt that the child was never (1.52 [1.27-1.82]) or sometimes (1.23 [1.12-1.36]) safe in his/her neighborhood. Severe AD was less common in children residing in a neighborhood with a bookmobile or library (0.68 [0.52-0.90]).

CONCLUSION:

US children residing in unsafe, unsupportive, or underdeveloped neighborhoods have higher prevalence and severity of AD.

PMID:
30712577
DOI:
10.1016/j.anai.2018.10.022

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