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Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2019 Apr;67:35-41. doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2019.01.011. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Microplastics occurrence in the Tyrrhenian waters and in the gastrointestinal tract of two congener species of seabreams.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno D'Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina, Italy.
2
Institute for Biological Resources and Marine Biotechnology (IRBIM), CNR Section of Messina Spianata San Raineri 86, 98122 Messina, Italy.
3
Department of Mathematical and Computational Sciences, Physical Science and Earth Science, University of Messina, Italy.
4
Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno D'Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina, Italy. Electronic address: cfaggio@unime.it.
5
Department of Biomedical, Dental and Morphological and Functional Imaging, Italy.

Abstract

In this work it is reported for the first time the characterization of microplastics from sea water samples and in two congener species of seabreams: Pagellus erythrinus and P. bogaraveo, Mediterranean fish species of great commercial importance. An experimental survey was conducted on May-June 2017 in the southernmost part of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Microplastics found in the sea water and in the grastrointestinal tract of two teleosts were characterized by Raman and IR spectroscopies. Microplastics found in sea water samples appeared in the form of fragments made of plastics of low and high density (PVC and LPDE). All the microplastics found in fish belonged to Nylon 66, typical fibers used in industry and in fisheries. Our findings highlighted the importance of further studies along the food web chain for a better understanding of the diffusion and possible consequences of this terrible threat.

KEYWORDS:

Fish; Marine litter; Microplastic; Pollution; μ-FTIR; μ-Raman

PMID:
30711873
DOI:
10.1016/j.etap.2019.01.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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