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Anesthesiol Clin. 2019 Mar;37(1):93-106. doi: 10.1016/j.anclin.2018.09.011. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

The Use of Point-of-Care Ultrasonography in Trauma Anesthesia.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, MC-2532-D, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA. Electronic address: DRamsingh@llu.edu.
2
Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Cardiovascular Anesthesia, Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, 4401 Wornall Road, Room 3103, Kansas City, MO 64111, USA; Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, 4401 Wornall Road, Room 3103, Kansas City, MO 64111, USA.

Abstract

Caring for the trauma patient requires an in-depth knowledge of the pathophysiology of trauma, the ability to rapidly diagnose and intervene to reverse the derangements caused by shock states, and an aptitude for the use of advanced monitoring techniques and perioperative point-of-care ultrasonography (P-POCUS) to assist in diagnosis and delivery of care. Historically, anesthesiology has lagged behind in wholly embracing this technology. P-POCUS has the potential to allow the trauma anesthesiologist to diagnose numerous injuries, quickly guide the placement of central vascular catheters and invasive monitors, and assess the efficacy of interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Perioperative point-of-care ultrasound; Point-of-care ultrasonography in trauma; Trauma anesthesia; Ultrasound applications for trauma; Ultrasound education in anesthesia

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