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Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2019 May;236:240-248. doi: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2019.01.021. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Research prioritization of interventions for the primary prevention of preterm birth: An international survey.

Author information

1
Women's Health Research Unit, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: j.allotey@qmul.ac.uk.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
3
Centre for Genomics and Child Health, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
4
Centre for Primary Care and Population Health, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
5
Women's Health Research Unit, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
6
UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP), Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Maternal and Child Health Program, Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify research priorities of interventions for the primary prevention of preterm birth (PTB), by conducting an international stakeholder survey.

STUDY DESIGN:

A prospective cross-sectional online survey was conducted in November 2016. Fifteen interventions to prevent spontaneous PTB were identified and ranked by stakeholders (n = 159) in the field of maternal and perinatal health research, using nine equally weighted criteria. Medians and interquartile ranges (IQRs) were calculated and the interventions ranked accordingly.

RESULTS:

Respondents to the survey were from 46 different countries, mostly from low and middle-income countries (62%, 99/159) and were mainly clinicians (80%, 127/159). Of the fifteen interventions ranked, the following five were identified as research priorities in the primary prevention of PTB: dietary counselling and nutritional education, risk scoring, vitamin D supplementation, exercise and antioxidant supplementation.

CONCLUSION:

We have identified research priorities of interventions to prevent spontaneous PTB through a global stakeholder survey. The interventions prioritized in this exercise can be used by researchers, grant funding bodies and research-policy decision makers to inform calls on future clinical trials or individual patient data meta-analyses on the primary prevention of PTB.

KEYWORDS:

Intervention; Preterm birth; Primary prevention; Research priorities; Survey

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