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Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2019 Feb;62:19-24. doi: 10.1016/j.cimid.2018.11.014. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Genetic diversity and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus originating from buffaloes with mastitis in Iran.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, P.O. Box 1177, Urmia, Iran.
2
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, P.O. Box 1177, Urmia, Iran. Electronic address: HDSaei561@gmail.com.

Abstract

The aims of the present study were to investigate the genetic diversity and methicillin resistance in S. aureus isolates recovered from mastitis-affected buffaloes. Five hundred seventy-eight milk samples were obtained from buffaloes with mastitis in three provinces, Iran. Ninety-one of the 578 tested samples contained S. aureus (15.74%), in two cases were methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Isolates were typed by spa typing, followed by MLST on some representative isolates and SCCmec typing for MRSA strains. The presence of genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was also tested by PCR. Eight spa types were identified, with t3576 (n = 18), t7311 (n = 18) and t937 (n = 17) were the most common, followed by t304 (n = 11), t7308 (n = 9), t521 (n = 7), t267 (n = 6), and t527 (n = 5). MLST revealed four different sequence types (STs) including ST97 (related to t521 and t527 spa types), ST352 (related to t267), ST291 (related to t304 and t937) and ST522 (related to t7338, t7311 and t3576). Two MRSA were identified as t304-ST291-SCCmecIV and t7311-ST522-SCCmecIV. No PVL-positive S. aureus were found. A significant difference in geographical distribution of genotypes was observed, with some types being prevalent in all studied provinces (P <  0.001). The results demonstrated genetic diversity among the S. aureus strains involved in mastitis in buffaloes. This study also provides evidence of the presence of MRSA belonging to genotypes which have been earlier reported in human infections, emphasizing the need for their epidemiological monitoring.

KEYWORDS:

Buffaloes; MLST; Mastitis; Methicillin; S. aureus; SCCmec typing; spa typing

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