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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Jan 30. pii: S0190-9622(19)30170-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2019.01.059. [Epub ahead of print]

Patients Believe Cosmetic Procedures Affect Their Quality of Life: An Interview Study of Patient-Reported Motivations.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; VA Boston Healthcare System: Jamaica Plain, Boston, MA; Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
2
Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
3
Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
4
Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; Department of Otolaryngology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: m-alam@northwestern.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

While treatments to address cosmetic concerns are common, patients' self-reported motives for considering such procedures have not been systematically explored.

OBJECTIVE:

To develop a framework of categories to describe patient's self-reported motivations for undergoing minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.

METHODS:

Face-to-face, semi-structured patient interviews were conducted with adult participants who had received or were considering minimally invasive cosmetic dermatologic procedures. A qualitative constant comparative approach was employed to analyze interview transcripts, yielding themes and subthemes.

RESULTS:

30 interviews were completed. Most patient-reported motivations for cosmetic procedures could be subsumed under eight general categories (themes): 1) mental and emotional health, 2) cosmetic appearance, 3) physical health, 4) work/school success, 5) social well-being, 6) cost/convenience, 7) procedural perceptions, and 8) timing of treatment. Many individual motivations in these categories were unrelated to desire for physical beauty. In particular, participants wanted to avoid being self-conscious, enhance confidence, reduce time and expense required to conceal physical imperfections, and be perceived as capable at work.

LIMITATIONS:

Only English-speaking patients in the U.S. were interviewed.

CONCLUSION:

Patient-reported motivations for cosmetic procedures mostly pertained to physical and psychosocial well-being. Indeed, a desire for improved cosmetic appearance comprised only one of the 8 themes revealed through patient interviews.

KEYWORDS:

affect; appearance; believe; cosmetic; emotion; interview; motivations; patient; patient reported; procedures; qualitative; quality of life

PMID:
30710607
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2019.01.059

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