Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Diabetes Complications. 2019 Apr;33(4):307-314. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2019.01.001. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Identifying solutions to psychological insulin resistance: An international study.

Author information

1
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; Behavioral Diabetes Institute, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: whp@behavioraldiabetes.org.
2
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, USA.
4
Amsterdam University Medical Centers, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
5
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
6
FIDAM GmBH, Bad Mergentheim, Germany.
7
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain.
8
Instituto Multidisciplinar de Medicina, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
9
King's College London, London, UK.
10
Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.
11
Lilly Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg, Germany.
12
Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
13
Analysis Group, Inc., Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

To identify actions of healthcare professionals (HCPs) that facilitate the transition to insulin therapy (IT) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) adults.

METHODS:

Included were T2Ds in seven countries (n = 594) who reported initial IT reluctance but eventually began IT. An online survey included 38 possible HCP actions: T2Ds indicated which may have occurred and their helpfulness. Also reported were delays in IT start after initial recommendation and any period of IT discontinuation.

RESULTS:

Exploratory factor analysis of HCP actions yielded five factors: "Explained Insulin Benefits" (EIB), "Dispelled Insulin Myths" (DIM), "Demonstrated the Injection Process" (DIP), "Collaborative Style" (CS) and "Authoritarian Style" (AS). Highest levels of helpfulness occurred for DIP, EIB and CS; lowest for AS. Participants who rated DIP as helpful were less likely to delay IT than those who rated DIP as less helpful (OR = 0.75, p = 0.01); participants who rated CS and EIB as helpful were less likely to interrupt IT than those who rated these as less helpful (OR = 0.55, p < 0.01; OR = 0.51, p = 0.01, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Three key HCP actions to facilitate IT initiation were identified as helpful and were associated with more successful initiation and persistence. These findings may aid the development of interventions to address reluctance to initiating IT.

KEYWORDS:

Insulin therapy; Patient communication; Perceived helpfulness; Physician; Psychological insulin resistance; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
30709604
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2019.01.001
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center