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Clin Lab Med. 2019 Mar;39(1):125-143. doi: 10.1016/j.cll.2018.10.003. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

MicroRNAs and Transplantation.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, New York-Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 East 68th Street, Box 3, New York, NY 10065, USA; Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Transplantation Medicine, New York-Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 East 68th Street, Box 3, New York, NY 10065, USA.
2
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, New York-Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 East 68th Street, Box 3, New York, NY 10065, USA; Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Transplantation Medicine, New York-Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 East 68th Street, Box 3, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: mut9002@med.cornell.edu.

Abstract

miRNAs, ∼20 to 22 nucleotide single-stranded RNA species that play a pivotal role in the regulation of protein-coding genes, are emerging as robust biomarkers for assessing allograft status. Herein, the authors briefly review the biogenesis and function of the miRNAs and provide an overview of the tools to quantify miRNAs in tissues and body fluids. They then review their studies of discovery and validation of alterations in miRNA expression within kidney allografts with or without acute rejection, as well as with or without fibrosis, and summarize published data on miRNA expression patterns in kidney transplant recipients.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; Kidney transplantation; Rejection; miRNA

PMID:
30709501
PMCID:
PMC6369703
[Available on 2020-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cll.2018.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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