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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Apr;119:151-160. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.01.028. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Prospective analysis of mid-facial fractures in a single-center pediatric-adolescent cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Plastic Maxillofacial Surgery, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube Str. 40, D-06120, Halle (Saale), Germany. Electronic address: waldemar.reich@medizin.uni-halle.de.
2
Dental Practice, Waldkerbelstraße 12, D-04329, Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: oliver.aust@googlemail.com.
3
Department of Oral and Plastic Maxillofacial Surgery, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube Str. 40, D-06120, Halle (Saale), Germany. Electronic address: alexander.eckert@uk-halle.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The complex architecture of the midface renders diagnosing and treating fractures challenging, especially for young patients who present the additional risk of suffering growth and development deficiencies, which is to be avoided at all costs.

OBJECTIVES:

This study sought to characterize pediatric mid-facial fractures considering the possible complications.

METHODS:

Between September 2008 and September 2018, data was collected on inpatients aged <18 years, treated for mid-facial fractures at the Halle University Hospital. Evaluated parameters were age, gender, cause and type of fracture, associated injuries, treatment, and complications.

RESULTS:

In total, 31 patients were examined; 20 were boys. The most common cause of injury was road traffic accident (41.9%). Orbital floor fracture was the most common type of injury (58.1%). In 54.8% of cases, surgery was performed.

CONCLUSION:

The incidence of complications associated with mid-facial fractures was low (n = 7), requiring treatment in only three cases (orthodontic, ophthalmological).

KEYWORDS:

Children; Complications; Facial fracture; Maxillofacial injuries; Mid-facial fractures; Pediatric trauma

PMID:
30708183
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.01.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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