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Med Clin North Am. 2019 Mar;103(2):235-250. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2018.10.007. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Nonmigraine Headache and Facial Pain.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, John R. Graham Headache Center, Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1153 Centre Street, Suite 4H, Boston, MA 02130, USA.
2
Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, John R. Graham Headache Center, Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1153 Centre Street, Suite 4H, Boston, MA 02130, USA. Electronic address: prizzoli@bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

The vast majority of headache patients encountered in the outpatient general medicine setting will be diagnosed with a primary headache disorder, mostly migraine or tension-type headache. Other less common primary headaches and secondary headaches, related to or caused by another condition, are the topic of this article. Nonmigraine primary headaches include trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, primarily cluster headache; facial pain, primarily trigeminal neuralgia; and miscellaneous headache syndromes, such as hemicrania continua and new daily persistent headache. Selected secondary headaches related to vascular disease, cerebrospinal fluid dynamics, and inflammatory conditions are also reviewed.

KEYWORDS:

CSF; Cluster; Facial pain; Headache; Neuralgia; Nonmigraine; Thrombosis; Trigeminal

PMID:
30704679
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcna.2018.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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