Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Surg Endosc. 2019 Jan 30. doi: 10.1007/s00464-019-06684-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Does adherence to perioperative enhanced recovery pathway elements influence patient-reported recovery following colorectal resection?

Author information

1
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery and Innovation, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Ave, E19-125, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada.
2
Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
3
Department of Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada.
4
Department of Anesthesia, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada.
5
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery and Innovation, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Ave, E19-125, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada. julio.fiorejunior@mcgill.ca.
6
Department of Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada. julio.fiorejunior@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are pivotal to promote patient-centered perioperative care. Adherence to enhanced recovery programs (ERPs) is associated with improved clinical outcomes (i.e., morbidity, length of stay), but the impact of adherence on PROMs is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the extent to which adherence to an ERP for colorectal surgery is associated with postoperative recovery as assessed using PROMs.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

100 patients were included [median age 63 (IQR 50-71) years, 81 laparoscopic, 37 rectal surgery]. Overall adherence to the ERP and adherence to specific ERP elements were analyzed. Adjusted linear regression was used to evaluate the association of adherence with PROMs assessing early recovery [Abdominal surgery impact scale (ASIS) and Multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI) on POD2] and late recovery (Duke Activity Status Index, RAND-36 Physical and Mental Summary Scores, Life-Space Mobility Assessment at 4 weeks after surgery). Missing data were addressed using multiple imputations.

RESULTS:

Median adherence to the ERP was 80% (16/20 elements, IQR 70-90%). Overall adherence was associated with ASIS scores on POD2 (4% increase per additional element, 95% CI 1-8%; p = 0.018). When specific ERP elements were analyzed, ASIS scores were associated with adherence to PONV prophylaxis (34% increase, 95% CI 5-63%; p = 0.023) and early solid food diet (20% increase, 95% CI 5-35%; p = 0.009). MFI General fatigue and MFI Mental fatigue scores on POD2 were associated with adherence to PONV prophylaxis (36% decrease, 95% CI - 64 to - 8%, p = 0.014 and 22% decrease, 95% CI - 44 to - 8%, p = 0.042). Overall adherence and adherence to specific elements were not associated with PROMs at 4 weeks after surgery.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that, from the perspective of patients, adherence to an ERP for colorectal surgery impacts early, but not late postoperative recovery. This result may reflect the lack of PROMs able to validly measure postoperative recovery beyond hospital discharge.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal surgery; Enhanced recovery; Outcome and process assessment (Health Care); Patient-reported outcome measures; Postoperative recovery

PMID:
30701367
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-019-06684-3

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center