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J Nutr Health Aging. 2019;23(2):211-216. doi: 10.1007/s12603-018-1122-5.

A Prospective Association of Nut Consumption with Cognitive Function in Chinese Adults aged 55+ _ China Health and Nutrition Survey.

Author information

1
Ming Li, Centre for Population Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, IPC CWE-48, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide SA 5001. Email: ming.li@unisa.edu.au. Tel: +61 (8) 83021051.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed to investigate the association of nut intake with cognitive function in Chinese adults aged 55 and over.

DESIGN:

This was a prospective open cohort study with repeated measurements of diet and cognition scores. Participants/settings: 4822 adults aged 55 and over participating in the China Health Nutrition Survey during 1991-2006.

MEASUREMENTS:

Global cognitive function measured repeatedly in 1997, 2001, 2004, and 2006 using a subset of modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status; poor cognitive function was defined as cognition score<7. Nut consumption was collected using 3-day 24 recall method in 1991, 1993, and at surveys of cognition assessment.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:

Multilevel mixed effect linear regression and logistic regression analysis were conducted to assess the association with cognitive function.

RESULTS:

The unadjusted cognitive score decreased by 0.29 (95% CI 0.22-0.28) with one-year aging during 1997-2006. Nut intake of more than 10g/d was associated with higher cognition score by 0.63 points (95% CI 0.15-1.12) or 40% less likely to have poor cognitive function (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.43-0.84) after adjusted for demographic, lifestyle behavioural, BMI, and energy intake.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nut consumption was inversely associated with cognition decline.

KEYWORDS:

China Nutrition and Health Survey; Nut consumption; cognition function; prospective association

PMID:
30697633
DOI:
10.1007/s12603-018-1122-5

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

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