Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Development. 2019 Feb 15;146(4). pii: dev166017. doi: 10.1242/dev.166017.

BMP signaling is required for amphioxus tail regeneration.

Author information

1
Department of Marine Biology, Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity and College of Marine Life Science, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China liangyujun@ouc.edu.cn sczhang@ouc.edu.cn.
2
Department of Marine Biology, Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity and College of Marine Life Science, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China.
3
Laboratory for Marine Biology and Biotechnology, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266003, China.

Abstract

Amphioxus, a cephalochordate, is an ideal animal in which to address questions about the evolution of regenerative ability and the mechanisms behind the invertebrate to vertebrate transition in chordates. However, the cellular and molecular basis of tail regeneration in amphioxus remains largely ill-defined. We confirmed that the tail regeneration of amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum is a vertebrate-like epimorphosis process. We performed transcriptome analysis of tail regenerates, which provided many clues for exploring the mechanism of tail regeneration. Importantly, we showed that BMP2/4 and its related signaling pathway components are essential for the process of tail regeneration, revealing an evolutionarily conserved genetic regulatory system involved in regeneration in many metazoans. We serendipitously discovered that bmp2/4 expression is immediately inducible by general wounds and that expression of bmp2/4 can be regarded as a biomarker of wounds in amphioxus. Collectively, our results provide a framework for understanding the evolution and diversity of cellular and molecular events of tail regeneration in vertebrates.

KEYWORDS:

Amphioxus; BMP signaling; Tail regeneration; Transcriptome

PMID:
30696711
DOI:
10.1242/dev.166017

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interestsThe authors declare no competing or financial interests.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center