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Nutrients. 2019 Jan 28;11(2). pii: E280. doi: 10.3390/nu11020280.

Association of Total and Trimester-Specific Gestational Weight Gain Rate with Early Infancy Weight Status: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study in China.

Hu J1,2, Aris IM3,4,5, Oken E6,7, Ma Y8, Ding N9, Gao M10, Wei X11, Wen D12.

Author information

1
Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110122, Liaoning, China. jjhu@cmu.edu.cn.
2
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. jjhu@cmu.edu.cn.
3
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Izzuddin_Aris@harvardpilgrim.org.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 119228 Singapore, Singapore. Izzuddin_Aris@harvardpilgrim.org.
5
Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, 119228 Singapore, Singapore. Izzuddin_Aris@harvardpilgrim.org.
6
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. emily_oken@harvardpilgrim.org.
7
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02113, USA. emily_oken@harvardpilgrim.org.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110122, Liaoning, China. ynma@cmu.edu.cn.
9
Department of Curriculum and Teaching Research, Research Center of Medical Education, China Medical University, Shenyang 110122, Liaoning, China. nding@cmu.edu.cn.
10
Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110122, Liaoning, China. cmugaom@163.com.
11
Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110122, Liaoning, China. xtwei@cmu.edu.cn.
12
Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110122, Liaoning, China. dlwen@cmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Studies to examine the associations of gestational weight gain (GWG) with offspring weight status during infancy are needed, especially among Asian populations. We examined 801 mother⁻infant pairs from a prospective cohort study in China to assess the associations of total and trimester-specific GWG with early infant weight status. We used linear mixed effects models and linear regression models to examine the longitudinal and time-point associations of GWG rate (kg/week) with infant growth measures (z-scores of body-mass-index (BMIZ), weight-for-age (WFAZ) and length-for-age (LFAZ)) at birth, 1, 3, and 6 months. Greater total GWG rate was associated with higher BMIZ (β:1.34 SD units (95% CI: 0.84, 1.83) per 1 kg/week increase in GWG) and higher WFAZ (β:1.18 SD units (95% CI: 1.01, 2.28)) across the first 6 months of life. GWG rate in the first two trimesters but not in the third trimester was positively associated with infant BMIZ. The association between GWG rate and infant BMIZ was significant at all timepoints and more pronounced in normal weight women and among male infants. In conclusion, greater GWG rate is positively associated with offspring BMIZ in the first 6 months of life, the association is mostly driven by GWG in the first two trimesters.

KEYWORDS:

body mass index; gestation weight gain; infancy; trimester-specific; weight status

PMID:
30695989
PMCID:
PMC6413060
DOI:
10.3390/nu11020280
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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