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Elife. 2019 Jan 29;8. pii: e44036. doi: 10.7554/eLife.44036.

Neuroblast-specific open chromatin allows the temporal transcription factor, Hunchback, to bind neuroblast-specific loci.

Author information

1
Institute of Neuroscience, Institute of Molecular Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Oregon, Eugene, United States.
2
Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Spatial and temporal cues are required to specify neuronal diversity, but how these cues are integrated in neural progenitors remains unknown. Drosophila progenitors (neuroblasts) are a good model: they are individually identifiable with relevant spatial and temporal transcription factors known. Here we test whether spatial/temporal factors act independently or sequentially in neuroblasts. We used Targeted DamID to identify genomic binding sites of the Hunchback temporal factor in two neuroblasts (NB5-6 and NB7-4) that make different progeny. Hunchback targets were different in each neuroblast, ruling out the independent specification model. Moreover, each neuroblast had distinct open chromatin domains, which correlated with differential Hb-bound loci in each neuroblast. Importantly, the Gsb/Pax3 spatial factor, expressed in NB5-6 but not NB7-4, had genomic binding sites correlated with open chromatin in NB5-6, but not NB7-4. Our data support a model in which early-acting spatial factors like Gsb establish neuroblast-specific open chromatin domains, leading to neuroblast-specific temporal factor binding and the production of different neurons in each neuroblast lineage.

KEYWORDS:

D. melanogaster; DamID; chromatin; developmental biology; neuroblast; neuroscience; spatial patterning; stem cell; temporal identity

PMID:
30694180
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.44036
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