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Nat Med. 2019 Feb;25(2):212-220. doi: 10.1038/s41591-018-0340-z. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Current and future influenza vaccines.

Author information

1
Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. yoshihiro.kawaoka@wisc.edu.
3
Department of Special Pathogens, International Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. yoshihiro.kawaoka@wisc.edu.
4
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, USA. yoshihiro.kawaoka@wisc.edu.

Abstract

Although antiviral drugs and vaccines have reduced the economic and healthcare burdens of influenza, influenza epidemics continue to take a toll. Over the past decade, research on influenza viruses has revealed a potential path to improvement. The clues have come from accumulated discoveries from basic and clinical studies. Now, virus surveillance allows researchers to monitor influenza virus epidemic trends and to accumulate virus sequences in public databases, which leads to better selection of candidate viruses for vaccines and early detection of drug-resistant viruses. Here we provide an overview of current vaccine options and describe efforts directed toward the development of next-generation vaccines. Finally, we propose a plan for the development of an optimal influenza vaccine.

PMID:
30692696
DOI:
10.1038/s41591-018-0340-z

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