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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Jan 26;16(3). pii: E346. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16030346.

Effect of 12-Week Swimming Training on Body Composition in Young Women.

Author information

1
Faculty of Physical Education and Sport in Biała Podlaska, Josef Pilsudski University of Physical Education in Warsaw, 2 Akademicka Str., 21-500 Biała Podlaska, Poland. malgorzata.charmas@awf-bp.edu.pl.
2
Faculty of Physical Education and Sport in Biała Podlaska, Josef Pilsudski University of Physical Education in Warsaw, 2 Akademicka Str., 21-500 Biała Podlaska, Poland. wilhelm.gromisz@awf-bp.edu.pl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Systematic physical activity can permanently prevent disadvantageous developments in the human body. This is very important especially for women, for whom the maintenance of a lean body in good shape is sometimes a primary consideration. However, in most cases, this activity is taken randomly and does not produce the desired effects such as reducing body fat. The purpose of the study was to evaluate changes in female body composition induced by 12 weeks of swimming training compared to sedentary controls.

METHODS:

Training sessions occurred three times per week (60 min/session). Height, body mass, and waist/hip circumference and waist/hips ratio (WHR) were measured. Body cell mass (BCM), total body water (TBW), extracellular (ECW) and intracellular water (ICW), fat mass (FM), lean mass (FFM), and muscle mass (MM) were measured using bioelectrical impedance (pre/post).

RESULTS:

Training elicited decreases in hip circumference and increase in WHR. No changes were recorded in BCM, TBW, ECW, ICW, FM, FFM, and MM. Controls experienced decreases in values of BCM, ICW, and MM and increases in ECW.

CONCLUSION:

The applied swimming training did not significantly affect the body composition parameters. Inactivity also triggered a tendency toward unhealthy movement of water from the intracellular to extracellular space.

KEYWORDS:

aerobic exercise; body composition; swimming training

PMID:
30691153
PMCID:
PMC6388213
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph16030346
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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