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World J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2019 Jan 28;35(2):28. doi: 10.1007/s11274-019-2600-6.

Ethyl-methanesulfonate mutagenesis generated diverse isolates of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the wheat stripe rust pathogen.

Li Y1, Wang M1, See DR1,2, Chen X3,4.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.
2
Wheat Health, Genetics, and Quality Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Pullman, WA, USA.
3
Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA. xianming.chen@ars.usda.gov.
4
Wheat Health, Genetics, and Quality Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Pullman, WA, USA. xianming.chen@ars.usda.gov.

Abstract

Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) is an obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen causing stripe rust, one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. Mutation is considered as one of the major mechanisms causing virulence changes in the pathogen population, but experimental evidence is limited. To study the effect of mutation on pathogen variation, we developed 33 mutant isolates by treating urediniospores of Pst race PSTv-18, avirulent to all of the 18 Yr single-gene lines used to differentiate Pst races, with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). These isolates were characterized as 24 races, including 19 new races, through virulence testing on the set of 18 wheat Yr single-gene differential lines; and as 21 multi-locus genotypes with 19 simple sequence repeat and 48 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. Most of the mutant isolates had more than one avirulence gene and more than one marker locus changed compared to the wild type isolate, indicating that EMS is able to cause mutations at multiple genome sites. The results showed that mutation can cause substantial changes in both avirulence and other genomic regions. The different frequencies of virulence among the mutant isolates suggested homozygous or heterozygous avirulence loci in the parental isolate, or relative ease of mutation at some avirulence loci. The results are useful for understanding evolutionary mechanisms of the important fungal pathogen.

KEYWORDS:

Avirulence; Mutation; Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici; Stripe rust; Wheat; Yellow rust

PMID:
30689125
DOI:
10.1007/s11274-019-2600-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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