Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Plast Surg. 2019 Jan;46(1):23-33. doi: 10.5999/aps.2018.00458. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Venous malformations of the head and neck: A retrospective review of 82 cases.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea.
2
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
3
Department of Vascular Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
4
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
5
Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
6
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Venous malformations (VMs) are a common type of vascular malformation. However, their causes and management remain unclear, and few studies specific to VMs of the head and neck have been reported. This study describes our experiences with VMs of the head and neck.

METHODS:

This retrospective study included 82 patients who underwent treatment for head and neck VMs, among 222 who visited our vascular anomalies center. Medical records between 2003 and 2016 were reviewed to identify common features in the diagnosis and treatment. The diagnosis of suspected head and neck VMs was based on the results of imaging studies or biopsies, and the VMs were analyzed based on magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and Doppler sonography findings.

RESULTS:

VMs were slightly more common in female patients (59.8%), and 45.1% of patients developed initial symptoms at the age of 10 or younger. Lesions were slightly more common on the right side (47.3%). The main sites involved were the cheek (27.7%) and lip area (25.5%). The muscle layer was commonly involved, in 98.7% of cases. Small lesions less than 5 cm in diameter accounted for 60.8% of cases, and well-defined types were slightly more prevalent at 55.4%. Improvement was observed in 77.1% of treated patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Early and accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment according to individual symptoms are important for successful treatment of VMs. If treatment is delayed, the lesions can worsen, or recurrence becomes more likely. Therefore, VMs require a multidisciplinary approach for early and accurate diagnosis.

KEYWORDS:

Head; Neck; Sclerotherapy; Surgery; Vascular malformations

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Publishing M2Community Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center